Wednesday, June 30, 2010

How to Deal With Age Discrimination When Finding a New Job

While employers generally will not tell you that you are being passed over because of your age, some do seek out younger workers to fill vacancies. Employers discriminate because they may feel that they can hire a junior candidate for a lower price than an older one would command. They may be afraid that workers who have reached middle age or beyond will be too set in their ways to adapt to the company culture. And some hiring managers are simply uncomfortable hiring and directing workers who may be their parents' age. Fortunately, there are ways to overcome the discrimination that older job-seekers might face.

Instructions

De-emphasize aspects of your resume that suggest you are older. Resume screeners can often get a sense of your age by looking at the year you graduated and the time frame of your earliest jobs. Omit the year you left school and leave out your earliest job or two unless they are critical to your professional experience. Remember, your resume is a marketing tool, not a confessional. You need not include information that does not advance your case. Let the hiring manager focus on your skills, not your years on Earth. But remember: Never lie on your resume or job application.

Keep skills up to date. Older workers may battle the perception that they lack familiarity with cutting-edge technology and the latest industry trends. They can quickly put such fears to rest by staying current with necessary software. Attending industry conferences to stay abreast of what is going on can be helpful. Reference new skills and knowledge on a resume, in a cover letter and in interviews.

Focus on networking. Because you have years of experience, you are likely to have more and deeper contacts than younger competitors. Leverage them. Additionally, chances are you will be applying for more senior positions. Because a bad hire at this level can be a costly mistake, managers frequently like to fill these jobs with people they know, or at least people referred to them by someone they know.

Look into legal action if you believe you have been discriminated against. Most of the time, it is more productive to focus on your job search and avoid lawyers and courtrooms, but if you believe the unfair treatment is blatant, then get in touch with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or consult with a lawyer well versed in labor law. You may be allowing an employer to break the law at your expense.

Tips & Warnings
  • Not all companies are created equal when it comes to hiring older workers, so ask around in your industry to find which ones value experience versus the ones striving for a culture of youth.
  • Job hunting is partially a numbers game; because a certain percentage of employers practice age discrimination. You may simply have to apply for more jobs than you would if you were younger.

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Time Management Tips for People Who Work at Home

Schedule at least one full day a week in the office. If you spend a majority of your time out of the office, set aside one day to spend in your office catching up on paperwork, making phone calls, and planning the following week. Determine which day of the week is slower for you in terms of phone calls you receive or appointments you make, and make that the day you spend in your office. You may have to make an effort to keep that day clear, but if you do, the rest of your week will go more smoothly.

Make appointments with yourself to work on certain tasks. Treat yourself as you would a client, and put yourself on your calendar. Block out certain time periods when you will work on specific tasks. The task could be a monthly report, a client proposal, or a marketing plan—something that needs to be done and that needs your full attention. Treat this time as an ap­pointment to keep, and make it a productive session. During this time, turn on your answering machine and concentrate only on the project you've scheduled. If you wait for an "opportune moment" to work on projects, it will never come.

Learn to say no. Do you have trouble saying no? When you don't set limits, the quality of your work suffers and your ability to maintain quality service is reduced. You end up disappointing the clients you didn't want to turn away. There's nothing wrong with being busy, until the quality of your ser­vice suffers.

Denise, a bank consultant, had so much to do that she started missing deadlines. Her home-based business had grown more quickly than she'd an­ticipated, but she didn't want to turn down any new clients. Soon, she was losing clients! I persuaded her to stop taking on more projects than she had time to complete and to concentrate on accomplishing her top-priority tasks first. Although it hurts to turn down work, clients are much more under­standing about your being busy than they are about your missing deadlines.

Keep like with like. Group similar items so that you'll be able to find what you need immediately. File related paperwork in the same place so that you'll have fewer places to look for it. When things are scattered around your of­fice, you end up spending more time looking for them.

It's also a good idea to group similar tasks. Run all of your calls at once so that you don't keep interrupting your work time with phone calls all day. Write all of your letters during another block of time. You'll find that they get done more quickly if you do several at once because you are able to fully concentrate on that particular type of task. When you're scheduling appointments, group them with other appointments. Schedule appointments in the same area at the same time, and avoid making two trips where one might do. Do all of your errands in one afternoon, instead of taking a little bit of time out of every afternoon. The more you group like tasks and like items together, the more efficiently you'll be using your time.

Have a place for everything. By now you know that your office should have "a place for everything, and everything in its place." Don't put things anywhere "for now," or they may end up there forever. Designate a specific place for the papers and supplies you need on a regular basis and remember to store the same types of items together. You will spend less time searching for lost items and more time accomplishing important tasks.

Take the extra few seconds to put something away where it belongs, in­stead of putting it near the place it belongs. Rather than putting it at the top of the basement stairs or by the door leading to the garage, take the extra minute to put it away properly. The greater number of times you handle an item before you put it away, the more time you waste.

This Article are Written By Mr. Blukor

Monday, June 28, 2010

10 Steps to Protect Your Great Idea

Got a Great Idea? Follow these First Steps

1. Put all your ideas, notes and drawings in an inventor’s journal, and have it signed, witnessed and dated. Be careful about disclosing your ideas to anyone—use a confidentiality or non-disclosure document when discussing your ideas.

2. Decide whether to file a provisional patent application with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. For more information on the benefits and how to file, visit the USPTO Web site at http://www.uspto.gov.


3. Conduct a Preliminary Patentability. Search to discover what patents exist like your ideas—and get a patent attorney to render you a Patentability Opinion. There are many ways to conduct the search, including the Patent Depository Libraries on the uspto.gov Web site. File a PTO Provisional Patent Application for one year if all looks good.

4. Make a model, demo or illustration and conduct preliminary market research with end-users. Know the consumers of your product, and listen to feedback. Use feedback to fine tune your project.

5. Investigate intellectual property filings such as utility and design patents in the United States and overseas. Also investigate copyrights, trademarks, service marks and domain name registrations for Web sites. Explore U.S. and international protection options and limitations.

6. Think about the two main pathways to inventing success: entrepreneurship or licensing—how do you want to be rewarded for your great ideas? The pathway you choose will dictate a lot of your actions—and budget.

7. Do not fall prey to invention development/promotion scams, which are prevalent. Check with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) for a list of these unscrupulous firms. If their promises sound too good to be true, they probably are. Get real professional help and seek the support of legitimate inventor organizations.

8. Investigate competitive products to make your product superior or better priced. Employ brainstorming techniques to evolve and accelerate the marketability of your ideas.

9. Find an inventor mentor—some one who's done this process before—to provide guidance.

10. Believe in your ideas and persevere—it takes some time and effort to do all this right. Be realistic about your goals and good luck.

This Article are written By Alan Tratner

Sunday, June 27, 2010

Making Social Networking Technology Work for You: A Recruiter's Perspective

Recently a job opening came up in my company for a recruiter. Naturally, I turned to my network to find candidates. Unlike the strategy I would have used five, three, or even two years ago to access my network, in 2007, I now turn to social networking technology.

Social networking sites abound and confusion swirls about the appropriateness of using them for business. While some sites cater primarily to the social needs of the millennial generation, others are not only legitimate for business use, but essential elements for any successful networker's toolkit. While millennial generation-based, purely social sites (such as MySpace and Facebook, despite the growing acceptance of Facebook as a business-related site) have been recently trying to spin themselves as sites for business, most professionals I know avoid them like the plague. As I tell my colleagues: Just as I don't look for potential employees on dating sites, I don't go looking for them on purely social networking sites. I stick to business networking sites (such as LinkedIn).

Too often as I give workshops around the country, I hear people say that they've put a profile up on a business networking site and "nothing happened." Putting a profile up is the equivalent of going to a business networking event alone, not wearing a nametag, and standing in the corner by the stuffed mushrooms. Business networking sites are valuable ways to leverage your existing networks and develop new ones. These sites also offer features that allow users to regulate the kind and frequency of contacts obtained, making it easy to “work” your network, but you do actually have to put some work into it. Here's how to make business networking site work for you:

  1. Take time completing your profile and thinking about who you want to find you. If you are looking to use a business networking site as a platform for job searching, make sure that your job history is fully described. Because it takes time to do, many social networkers simply list the title and current company. Think about the recruiter looking to find you. While I may be looking for a person with your title, I'm just as likely to be looking for key words. Describe each of your positions in 100 words or fewer.

    If you are using a business networking site to develop business, ensure that you fully describe the goods/services you are offering. You might also consider listing client companies. If I am looking for someone who has experience selling to Target, I will likely use that as a key word to query the network. Profiles with that key word will pop up for me.

  2. Understand the contact settings on the business networking site. Each business networking site has contact settings, and they vary. Read the explanations of the contact settings and make sure that yours are set appropriately. Are you interested in talking to people who want to get the inside scoop on your company? Want to talk to salespeople? Want to hear from headhunters? The reason that business networking site work so well as that these contact settings work as filters. Don't want me to contact you about a fabulous job at my company? Set your contact settings appropriately.

    As you begin to grow your network, respect the contact settings of others. Do not be a social networking slimeball: If someone's contact setting says no sales emails, then don't send one. Business networking sites are quite adamant about this protocol; violate the contact settings, and you can be reported by the person you reached out to inappropriately. In this case remember that inappropriate doesn't (only) mean solicitations for money-laundering schemes; inappropriate means sending a solicitation of any kind that is contrary to the person's contact settings. No means no.

  3. Understand keyword loading. Keyword loading is all the rage, and for good reason. People searching a business networking site will often search by keywords, and those key words may NOT be those that appear organically on your profile. Here's an example: as a recruiter, I am always looking for Power Electronics Designers (in fact, if you are one, call me right now). When I am searching a business networking site, I will use search terms including "power electronics" but also "electrical engineer," "MSEE," and "feedback control systems." For all profiles, I recommend including 35 keywords related to the job you are looking for or the service you seek to provide. In this way, you maximize the chances that your profile will be returned in a search.

    Many business networking sites do not have a section for keywords. Simply list them at the end of your profile. Do not bother to repeat words that appear in your position description already; they are already there! Instead, concentrate on job titles, concrete skills, clients, and competencies. A word of caution here: Don't bother to waste the space by keyword-loading soft skills; I will never search a business networking site for "people person."

    Here's an example of a keywords listing for an English major looking to break into advertising and PR: corporate communications, marketing assistant, greeting card writer, editor, scientific and technical writing, PageMaker, Quark, grammarian.

  4. Decide on your networking style. Most sites allow unlimited networking, meaning you can connect with as many people as you like. The social networking community as a whole seems fairly evenly split on sheer numbers of contacts vs. contacts with people you already know. Some networkers believe that the more connections they have, the better. Others believe it is important to know every person in their networks. While it's not necessarily important to immediately decide which social networking philosophy you ascribe to, you will be presented with this decision fairly regularly.

    My strategy varies according to the different networking sites. On sites where it is a practice to recommend one person in my network to another person, I take a very conservative approach; I connect only with people I know and can actually recommend. This strategy isn't as limiting as it may seem, as I operationalize "know" fairly loosely -- colleagues, business acquaintances, people who have attended a workshop of mine and followed up after. I like to know a little bit about the people in my network, and I want them to know a little bit about me. After all, when I make a referral, I am de facto endorsing this person, and I want to know whom I'm endorsing.

  5. Personalize your networking and connecting. As you reach out to expand your network, take the one or two extra minutes required to personalize your networking and connecting. Some sites have automated, canned invitations to connect. Without exception, I delete invitations from anyone who has not bothered to insert a personalized note into the invitation. Don't have the time to add five or six words to personalize? Then I don't have the time to answer.

    Remember, social networking technology is an equivalent of a big online networking reception. You would never approach a person and say as your opening salvo "can I have your business card." Instead, you would introduce yourself, chat a few minutes and then exchange cards.

    Similarly, if you are unsure if a person in your past will recognize who you are, remind him/her of who you are and your past relationship. One of my favorite graduate students of all time just reached out to me through a business networking site with this message: "Not sure if you remember me -– hope we can connect." Now because he is one of my favorite graduate students of all time, I did remember him, but if I had not, this wouldn't have been a good message. This message is the in-person equivalent of someone who comes up to you at a networking event and says "you probably don't remember me" and then stands there. Much better to say/write: "Hello Mark, we worked together at Northeastern University in Student Activities. Now I am working as an equities broker at Fidelity. So good to connect with you."

  6. Mind your manners. Some sites allow you to solicit and receive endorsements from people in your network. Small tidbits of recommendation, these help add gravitas to your profile. If asked to make a recommendation, consider if you know the person well enough and if you have good things to say. If you don't have good things to say, don't write a mediocre recommendation. The reason? Your recommendation is shown both on your page and on the recommendee's page. You don't want your profile to be diluted with a number of milquetoast recommendations.

    If you ask for and receive a recommendation or a referral for a job take two seconds and write a thank you email to your network. Social networks, like all good networks, are fed both good intentions and good actions. If someone does a good turn for you, at the very least say thank you.

Final Thoughts
Social networking on a business networking site is an essential way of doing business. It's a new technology and early adopters are getting the most out of their networks. Get out there, create a profile and get networking; you'll be happy you did!

This article are written by Maureen Crawford Hentz

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Saturday, June 26, 2010

Turn Unemployment into Self-Employment: 5 Tips on How to Start

Losing a job is never easy, no matter what the cause. A large recession may get you a lot of company but that never solves the problem of how you can get back on the path to work and a steady income. Coming from the formerly heavily industrial city of Pittsburgh, you probably won’t return to that steady income by waiting to be called back to work. And really, the key word here is work; that is what you are looking for -- the system to turn your labor into money. Maybe now is the time for you to work for you.

I am not talking about building an empire -- starting with a small idea and growing it into a major force employing many. That may happen, but it is very rare and accomplished by those who have a real entrepreneurial drive. You do not need a major venture order to earn a living by being self-employed. This article offers five smaller ideas to work on.

1. Become a contractor to the company that you just left. If your employer had work but needed fewer hours or people, you may be able to come back as a subcontractor. You do the work when it is available and find something else when business is slow. This technique works in only some industries -- building contracting, IT services, graphic design and professional services, home healthcare, and more -- as you must be a true independent employee to comply with the current tax laws, which means you control your own schedule and your own tools.

The value to the employer is that the extra employees do not become overhead when business is slow, and the value to you is that you will make more money for fewer hours if all of your time is spent o n productive work.

2. Do the same work for several companies. If you have been a valuable asset to your former employer and can provide the same value to others in the same industry, set up a single-member limited liability corporation (LLC), the easiest way to form a corporation, and market your skills to all businesses that may need them. Your projects will be shorter, but your payments will be higher. The key to success here is in the marketing.

3. Look for a small company to buy. By small, I am talking about fewer than five employees. Owners looking to retire may be willing to finance the purchase, and then you can pay for it out of increased cash flow as it grows. Some businesses just need new energy to drive them on to better results.

4. Consider a franchise. The prepackaged business startup comes in many sizes and many price ranges -- from consulting programs to full-scale restaurants. You will get assistance in all phases of the business and ongoing support. Lenders sometimes are more comfortable making loans to a franchise because of the existing track record of the other similar operations.

Remember that you will have to follow a prescribed business path which may keep you from exploiting some of your personal strengths, and you will have ongoing royalties to pay. Make sure that you are getting value in terms of corporate marketing for those fees.

5. Look for Strategic Partners. If the skills you have at not quite enough to cover all of the bases, you may be able to find someone whose strengths are complementary. For example, you have the technical skills but weak sales and marketing skills, or you could sell virtually anything but don’t do well with details. Find someone who is compatible and consider various forms of joint work. You may form a business together or may function only as a joint venture. The main difference between the two is one is permanent, and the other has a timeframe and a goal; when the goal is reached, the venture ends.

An economic downturn is a great time for all kinds of creative collaborations, building virtual businesses that operate to meet the current level of demand. With little overhead, you can be very flexible and make comfortable profits.

Final Thoughts
At a time when companies are reluctant to hire, we all need to get out of our comfort zone and find new answers. Self-employment may be a temporary solution or a permanent change of direction.

This article are written by Suzanne Caplan

Thursday, June 24, 2010

10 Steps To Sell Yourself in a Job Interview

Step-01

Find out as much as you can about the company: How is it performing? What is its mission statement and who are its customers? What are the interviewer's priorities and responsibilities? The more you know, the more you'll be able to ask informed questions about the job.

Step-02

Study the description of the job for which you have applied. Be clear on what is expected and if you have the background and skills to do it.

Step-03

Take an inventory of your strengths and practice discussing how they complement the requirements of the job. Write down specific examples that demonstrate these strengths and be able to speak fluidly and intelligently about them.

Step-04

Make a winning first impression at the interview. Be prompt, make eye contact and give a firm handshake. Dress one notch above what's expected for the position you're interviewing for.

Step-05

Look for common ground between you and the interviewer to establish a positive rapport and to stand out from the crowd. You may have the same alma mater or mutual friends. Be careful not to overplay this and look desperate.

Step-06

Turn what could be seen as potential weaknesses into strengths. You might say "I haven't worked in promotions but I coordinated getting the word out for my son's school carnival and we had twice as many people attend this year." Be calm and confident.

Step-07

Use specific examples to describe why you're a perfect match for the job. Ask probing questions to demonstrate a genuine interest in the position. In the process, interview the interviewer to find out why the position is open. Get a sense of what the turnover rate is at the company, what the position's job track is, and how the company keeps its employees happy. You're trying to find out if you want to work for that company as much as they're trying to find out if they want you.

Step-08

Demonstrate that you are a problem-solver. Identify an issue the company is facing or a problem you might potentially encounter in that job and discuss how you'd solve it.

Step-09

Make the interviewer feel good about hiring you. Be enthusiastic, responsive, truthful and friendly.

Step-10

Follow up with a thank-you note that reiterates your qualifications and mentions specific topics covered in the interview to trigger the person's memory about your winning interview.






  • Step 2

    Study the description of the job for which you have applied. Be clear on what is expected and if you have the background and skills to do it.

  • Step 3

    Take an inventory of your strengths and practice discussing how they complement the requirements of the job. Write down specific examples that demonstrate these strengths and be able to speak fluidly and intelligently about them.

  • Step 4

    Make a winning first impression at the interview. Be prompt, make eye contact and give a firm handshake. Dress one notch above what's expected for the position you're interviewing for.

  • Step 5

    Look for common ground between you and the interviewer to establish a positive rapport and to stand out from the crowd. You may have the same alma mater or mutual friends. Be careful not to overplay this and look desperate.

  • Step 6

    Turn what could be seen as potential weaknesses into strengths. You might say "I haven't worked in promotions but I coordinated getting the word out for my son's school carnival and we had twice as many people attend this year." Be calm and confident.

  • Step 7

    Use specific examples to describe why you're a perfect match for the job. Ask probing questions to demonstrate a genuine interest in the position. In the process, interview the interviewer to find out why the position is open. Get a sense of what the turnover rate is at the company, what the position's job track is, and how the company keeps its employees happy. You're trying to find out if you want to work for that company as much as they're trying to find out if they want you.

  • Step 8

    Demonstrate that you are a problem-solver. Identify an issue the company is facing or a problem you might potentially encounter in that job and discuss how you'd solve it.

  • Step 9

    Make the interviewer feel good about hiring you. Be enthusiastic, responsive, truthful and friendly.

  • Step 10

    Follow up with a thank-you note that reiterates your qualifications and mentions specific topics covered in the interview to trigger the person's memory about your winning interview

  • Step 2

    Study the description of the job for which you have applied. Be clear on what is expected and if you have the background and skills to do it.

  • Step 3

    Take an inventory of your strengths and practice discussing how they complement the requirements of the job. Write down specific examples that demonstrate these strengths and be able to speak fluidly and intelligently about them.

  • Step 4

    Make a winning first impression at the interview. Be prompt, make eye contact and give a firm handshake. Dress one notch above what's expected for the position you're interviewing for.

  • Step 5

    Look for common ground between you and the interviewer to establish a positive rapport and to stand out from the crowd. You may have the same alma mater or mutual friends. Be careful not to overplay this and look desperate.

  • Step 6

    Turn what could be seen as potential weaknesses into strengths. You might say "I haven't worked in promotions but I coordinated getting the word out for my son's school carnival and we had twice as many people attend this year." Be calm and confident.

  • Step 7

    Use specific examples to describe why you're a perfect match for the job. Ask probing questions to demonstrate a genuine interest in the position. In the process, interview the interviewer to find out why the position is open. Get a sense of what the turnover rate is at the company, what the position's job track is, and how the company keeps its employees happy. You're trying to find out if you want to work for that company as much as they're trying to find out if they want you.

  • Step 8

    Demonstrate that you are a problem-solver. Identify an issue the company is facing or a problem you might potentially encounter in that job and discuss how you'd solve it.

  • Step 9

    Make the interviewer feel good about hiring you. Be enthusiastic, responsive, truthful and friendly.

  • Step 10

    Follow up with a thank-you note that reiterates your qualifications and mentions specific topics covered in the interview to trigger the person's memory about your winning interview

  • Step 2

    Study the description of the job for which you have applied. Be clear on what is expected and if you have the background and skills to do it.

  • Step 3

    Take an inventory of your strengths and practice discussing how they complement the requirements of the job. Write down specific examples that demonstrate these strengths and be able to speak fluidly and intelligently about them.

  • Step 4

    Make a winning first impression at the interview. Be prompt, make eye contact and give a firm handshake. Dress one notch above what's expected for the position you're interviewing for.

  • Step 5

    Look for common ground between you and the interviewer to establish a positive rapport and to stand out from the crowd. You may have the same alma mater or mutual friends. Be careful not to overplay this and look desperate.

  • Step 6

    Turn what could be seen as potential weaknesses into strengths. You might say "I haven't worked in promotions but I coordinated getting the word out for my son's school carnival and we had twice as many people attend this year." Be calm and confident.

  • Step 7

    Use specific examples to describe why you're a perfect match for the job. Ask probing questions to demonstrate a genuine interest in the position. In the process, interview the interviewer to find out why the position is open. Get a sense of what the turnover rate is at the company, what the position's job track is, and how the company keeps its employees happy. You're trying to find out if you want to work for that company as much as they're trying to find out if they want you.

  • Step 8

    Demonstrate that you are a problem-solver. Identify an issue the company is facing or a problem you might potentially encounter in that job and discuss how you'd solve it.

  • Step 9

    Make the interviewer feel good about hiring you. Be enthusiastic, responsive, truthful and friendly.

  • Step 10

    Follow up with a thank-you note that reiterates your qualifications and mentions specific topics covered in the interview to trigger the person's memory about your winning interview

  • Step 2

    Study the description of the job for which you have applied. Be clear on what is expected and if you have the background and skills to do it.

  • Step 3

    Take an inventory of your strengths and practice discussing how they complement the requirements of the job. Write down specific examples that demonstrate these strengths and be able to speak fluidly and intelligently about them.

  • Step 4

    Make a winning first impression at the interview. Be prompt, make eye contact and give a firm handshake. Dress one notch above what's expected for the position you're interviewing for.

  • Step 5

    Look for common ground between you and the interviewer to establish a positive rapport and to stand out from the crowd. You may have the same alma mater or mutual friends. Be careful not to overplay this and look desperate.

  • Step 6

    Turn what could be seen as potential weaknesses into strengths. You might say "I haven't worked in promotions but I coordinated getting the word out for my son's school carnival and we had twice as many people attend this year." Be calm and confident.

  • Step 7

    Use specific examples to describe why you're a perfect match for the job. Ask probing questions to demonstrate a genuine interest in the position. In the process, interview the interviewer to find out why the position is open. Get a sense of what the turnover rate is at the company, what the position's job track is, and how the company keeps its employees happy. You're trying to find out if you want to work for that company as much as they're trying to find out if they want you.

  • Step 8

    Demonstrate that you are a problem-solver. Identify an issue the company is facing or a problem you might potentially encounter in that job and discuss how you'd solve it.

  • Step 9

    Make the interviewer feel good about hiring you. Be enthusiastic, responsive, truthful and friendly.

  • Step 10

    Follow up with a thank-you note that reiterates your qualifications and mentions specific topics covered in the interview to trigger the person's memory about your winning interview

  • 6 Reasons Why People Are Afraid to Start a Business


    Starting a new business can be a turbulent undertaking. For one thing, there are no guarantees of success. Businesses fail every single day, and plenty of entrepreneurs come away with nothing to show for months or years of hard-fought effort. The idea of sacrificing a steady salary for an uncertain, hoped-for payday also tends to provoke anxiety.

    While some are undeterred by these obstacles, others opt to play it safe and scrap their business plans altogether. Below are six of the most prevailing reasons why people are afraid to start businesses (and whether they make sense.)

    1. The Economy

    Some of the most common fears about starting businesses relate to how “the economy” is doing. If the economy is in a lull, many would be entrepreneurs assume that now must necessarily be the wrong time to get started. This belief is reinforced by nay-saying politicians and journalists who exaggerate even the very worst economic news.

    Remember, though, that there is no single entity called “the economy.” What is loosely referred to as the economy is really just the vast, interconnected web of buyers and sellers accommodating each other through the market and price system. Moreover, there are two sides to every transaction. While some sectors of the economy may be hurting (such as finance and housing today), those on the other side of the affected transaction (like foreclosure specialists and storage facilities) could be thriving.

    2. Uncertainty

    Another fear that stops entrepreneurs from getting started is the uncertainty inherent in owning a business. Unlike a salaried job, business ownership provides no immediate or guaranteed pay. Income, if any, is commensurate with the company’s sales or profits. If you have grown accustomed to being paid on a regular schedule regardless of outcome, trading that in for the uncertainty of business ownership can feel like a leap of faith. It is entirely legitimate to wonder if your business will be capable of providing for you or your family.

    That said, there is a flip side to the uncertainty. If and when your business does produce an income, no boss or employer can take it away. Never again will you have to plead for a raise or demonstrate why you “deserve” more. In business, your income is entirely determined by what you produce and/or sell.

    3. Indecision

    Others have reservations because they are undecided about what type of business to start. More often than not, these are people who know they want to be self-employed, but not in what capacity. This, too, can be a legitimate fear to have. If you currently work in a steady career, it is not enough to simply “go into business.” In order to credibly go off on your own, you must be confident about what kind of business you will open. You must also have the skills and expertise to succeed in that business.

    Current or previous jobs are a good reference point. If you currently work for an accounting firm, starting your own is perfectly reasonable. Deciding to abruptly change course and buy an Alaskan crab fishing boat might warrant more scrutiny.

    4. Debt

    Debt can constitute a serious obstacle to entrepreneurship. If you are saddled with student loans or credit card bills, it will be difficult to obtain any start-up financing you might need. In severe instances (such as if your wages are being garnished), any income your business produces will go directly to your creditors anyway.

    Needless to say, concern about your pre-existing debt is a completely defensible reason to fear starting a business. Rather than trying to juggle both at once, focus squarely on repaying all of your debts first. Once your financial slate is wiped clean, you can move on to business ownership with a clear mind.

    5. Family Obligations

    Financial concerns are not the only reason people fear starting businesses. The early years of a new company can be incredibly taxing, and some fear having little time to spend with their families. After all, everyone gets the same 24 hours in a day. There is only so much of yourself to go around, and if you’re putting in ten or twelve hour days at work, there is no way to also spend that time at home. (Unless you have a home office, that is.)

    It may truthfully be that family time is a deal-breaker for you. On the other hand, don’t be too quick to relinquish your ambitions. Discuss with your spouse whether arrangements or sacrifices can be made for the early days of your company.

    6. No Benefits

    Finally, other would-be entrepreneurs worry about what losing benefits, such as employer-provided health insurance or 401(k) contributions, will do to their overall finances. This, too, is a serious concern worth addressing. Perhaps you or a family member has a long-standing health condition. In such a scenario, a sudden lack of coverage could prove devastating.

    Not every situation is so dire, however. Retirement accounts (including IRAs, Solo 401(k)s and self-employed pensions) can be opened and funded on your own without the help of any employer. It may also be possible to form a pool with other entrepreneurs and buy health insurance at lower group rates, which is essentially how large employers buy it.

    Wednesday, June 23, 2010

    Google is Reducing Share of AdSense Publishers

    The latest earnings report from Google has some not-so-good news for web publishers (bloggers included) who are monetizing their online content through the Google AdSense program.

    Google AdSense - Revenue Share

    While Google has never disclosed the exact percentage of revenue that it shares with AdSense publishers, once can easily derive that number using the earnings report that are released at the end of each quarter.

    The “Google Network Revenues” section reflects the total revenue that was generated though AdSense while the “Traffic Acquisition Costs” section reflects the total amount that was paid by Google to AdSense publishers. To know the approximate revenue share, simply divide TAC with the total AdSense revenue.

    Here’s a quick chart comparing these numbers for the year 2009. The percentage of revenue that Google is sharing with AdSense publishers has reduced from 75% in Q1 to 72% in Q4 2009. That’s not a very exciting news.


    Q1 ‘09 Q2 ‘09 Q3 ‘09 Q4 ‘09
    What Google earned from AdSense (in billion) $1.64 $1.68 $1.80 $2.04
    What Google paid to AdSense publishers (in billion) $1.23 $1.24 $1.33 $1.47
    Percentage share of AdSense Publishers 75.0% 73.8% 73.9% 72.1%

    The following charts have numbers from the last eight quarters.

    Traffic Acquisition Cost Google Quarterly Revenue

    Tuesday, June 22, 2010

    20 Insane ways to get Fired from your Job

    No more wondering on “how to lose your job“, try these 20 killer tips, which will surely get you kicked out of your job and you can join the list of unemployed people. First you need to figure out the purpose of getting yourself fired, if you are absolutely certain then only try these tips.

    Note: Try these tips at your own risk, the author of this post will not be responsible for your unemployment.


    Stop Working – To start with, stop doing the work that is assigned to you.

    Become the Excuse Expert – Give stupid and weird excuses to your boss on incomplete work assignments. It’s very important that the excuses should be lame and shall not seem to be a genuine one

    .
    Play pranks in the office – Bring a pet snake in the office or throw glue around the office chairs and tables. Cut the telephone wires and glue your bosses mouse to the table.

    Keep messing around – It’s always beneficial for a person who wants to get fired off its job to create mess in the office as it really disturbs the fellow employees.

    Sell your office on eBay – This one is hilarious and 100 percent effective, sell your office stuff on eBay and you’ll be on your way home with that much needed termination letter in your hand

    Miss all the meetings – Never attend any office meeting and specially the most important ones.

    Throw a party – Call your friends in your office and throw them a party on the office’s expense.

    Lunch Havoc – Create a havoc during lunch by stealing your colleagues lunches from the office kitchen. Eat your lunch like an animal and make your fellow office mates disgusted



    Listen to your favorite music – Take out your worst music collection out and listen it loud in the office. To add to the torture mumble songs in most horrible way in which you can sing.

    The Big Fat Liar - Lie for each and every obvious thing possible, and make it obvious by lying about stupid things like I’m not at my desk or I dint received that file, etc.

    Dress obnoxiously – Wear clothes that you wouldn’t even wear to the slumber party, try and wear clothes with rude slogans and gestures.

    Be an Abuser - Abuse every second person around you, be it juniors or even your superiors the most horrible abuse or bad words anyone would have ever heard before.

    Start a business – Start a business from your office and make it obvious in front of your boss.



    Drink Alcohol – Get drunk while you are on the job, chew Tobacco.

    Infect your office with a deadly virus – keep on inserting viruses in the computer systems every time it gets cleaned up. Try and destroy the important data files from the server

    Spam your Office mates.

    Spread rumors – Spread raunchy rumors regarding your boss and the assistant secret affairs and make it obvious that you are the person behind them.

    Pet name your boss – Give your boss a disgusting pet name and make sure your boss gets to know that you are the one invented the name for him.

    Steal things – Steal things from your boss’s office and keep them arranged properly on your desk so that he can notice that easily.


    Take your boss out on dinner and never show up.

    Well these were some very simple and crazy ways of getting fired, I hope you try them and achieve your goal easily.


    Thanks to Shravan for this Article.

    Thursday, June 17, 2010

    Honey as a Medicine for Professionals


    No doubt Honey contain some miracle properties. It is usually used in various foods and beverages as a sweetener and flavoring. It also has a role in religion and symbolism. Flavors of honey vary based on source types and various types and grades of honey are available. It is also used in various medicinal traditions to treat ailments. in this article, we have shared some of major medicinal uses and benefits of honey for our health.

    Benefits and Medicinal Uses of Honey


    Conjunctivitis: (pus in the eye)

    Honey dissolved in equal quantity of warm water. Apply, when cooled, as lotion or eye bath.

    Nasal congestion

    Place a dessert spoon of honey in a basin of hot water and inhale fumes after covering your head with a towel over the basin.

    Sleeplessness:

    A dessert spoon of honey in a mug of hot milk aids sleep and works wonders

    Antibacterial and antifungal:

    Undiluted honey inhibits the growth of bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, certain gut pathogens and fungi such as Candida albicans. At a concentration of 30-50%, honey has been shown to be superior to certain conventional antibiotics in treating urinary tract infections.

    Anti-diarrheal:

    Various gut bacteria known to cause diarrhea and dysentery such as salmonella, shigella, enteropathogenic E. coli and vibrio cholera. In one study, honey given with oral rehydration fluid was shown to reduce the duration of bacterial diarrhea in infants and children.

    Wound healing and anti-inflammatory:

    Honey can also be used externally to promote healing when applied to wounds, even in postoperative wounds. Honey is of value in treating burns, infected surgical wounds. Honey is very viscous, enabling it to absorb water from surrounding inflamed tissue.

    Anti-tussive and expectorant:

    These anti-cough properties of honey are related to its capacity to dilute bronchial secretions and improve the function of the bronchial epithelium

    Nutritional properties:

    Uncontaminated honey is a healthy, easily digestible, natural and energy rich food. It contains carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, enzymes and vitamins. One tablespoon of honey provides 60 calories and contains 11g of carbohydrates, 1mg of calcium, 0.2mg of iron, 0.lmg of vitamin B and 1mg of vitamin C.

    Skin infections:
    Applying honey and cinnamon powder in equal parts on the affected parts cures Eczema, Ringworm and all types of skin infections.

    Heart diseases:
    Make a paste of honey and cinnamon powder, apply on bread and eat it regularly for breakfast. It reduces the cholesterol in the arteries and saves the patient from heart attack. Also those who have already had an attack, if they do this process daily, are kept miles away from the next attack, Regular use of the above process relieves loss of breath and strengthens the heart beat.

    Bladder infections:

    Take two tablespoons of cinnamon powder and one teaspoon of honey in a glass of Luke warm water and drink it. It destroys the germs of the bladder.

    Immune System:

    Daily use of honey and cinnamon powder strengthens the immune system and protects the body from bacteria and viral attacks.


    Monday, June 14, 2010

    Career Planning Tips

    Building a Career

    Today, and more than ever, most people are responsible for building their own careers.

    Whether you are just starting, or you have several years of experience, these paragraphs might help you advance your career.

    The 9 most important career planning tips is listed below:


    1. Never Stop Learning

    Life-long learning is your keyword.

    The world is constantly changing, and everybody is looking for new ways of doing business.

    If you have decided that your current skills are good enough, you have also decided that your current job is good enough.

    But if you want a career in the future, you should add regular updates to your skills and knowledge.


    2. Ask, Listen And Learn

    A good listener can learn a lot.

    Listen to your co-workers, your boss, and your superiors. You can learn a lot from their experience.

    Ask about issues that interest you, and listen to what they say. Let them tell you about how things work, and what you could have done better.

    Most people will love to be your free tutor.


    3. Fulfill Your Current Job

    Your current job might be best place to start your career.

    It is often very little that separates successful people from the average. But nothing comes free.

    If you do your job well and fulfill your responsibilities, this is often the best way to start a new career.

    Talk to your supervisor about things you can do. Suggest improvements. Offer your help when help is needed. In return ask for help to build a better career. It is often possible - right inside your own organization - especially if you have proved to be a valued employee.


    4. Build Your Network

    Your next career step might arise from your contact network.

    Did you know that more than 50% of all jobs are obtained from contact networks?

    If you have a good contact network, it is also a good place to discover future careers, to explore new trends, and to learn about new opportunities.

    Spend some time building new contacts, and don't forget to maintain the ones you already have.

    One of the best ways to get serious information from your network is to regularly ask your contacts how they are, what they do, and what is new about their careers.


    5. Identify Your Current Job

    Your current job should be identified, not assumed.

    Make sure you don't work with tasks you assume are important. This is waste of time and talent.

    When you start in a new job, talk to your superior about your priorities. If you're not sure about what is most important, then ask him. And ask him again. Often you will be surprised about the differences between what you assume, and what is really important.


    6. Identify Your Next Job

    Your dream job must be identified.

    Before you start planning your future career, be sure you have identified your dream job.

    In your dream job, you will be doing all the things you enjoy, and none of the things you don't enjoy. What kind of job would that be?

    Do you like or dislike having responsibility for other employees. Do you like to work with technology or with people? Do you want to run your own business? Do you want to be an artist, a designer or a skilled engineer? A manager?

    Before building your future career your goal must be identified.


    7. Prepare Yourself

    Your dream might show up tomorrow. Be prepared.

    Don't wait a second. Update your CV now, and continue to update it regularly.

    Tomorrow your dream job may show up right before your nose. Prepare for it with a professional CV and be ready to describe yourself as a valuable object to anyone that will try to recruit you.

    If you don't know how to write a CV, or how to describe yourself, start learning it now.


    8. Pick The Right Tools

    Pick the tools you can handle.

    You can build your future career using a lot of different tools. Studying at W3Schools is easy. Taking a full master degree is more complicated.

    You can add a lot to your career by studying books and tutorials (like the one you find at W3Schools). Doing short time courses with certification tests might add valuable weight to your CV. And don't forget: Your current job is often the most valuable source of building new skills.

    Don't pick a tool that is too heavy for you to handle!


    9. Realize Your Dreams

    Put your dreams into action.

    Don't let a busy job kill your dreams. If you have higher goals, put them into action now.

    If you have plans about taking more education, getting a better job, starting your own company or something else, you should not use your daily job as a "waiting station". Your daily job will get more and more busy, you will be caught up in the rat race, and you will burn up your energy.

    If you have this energy, you should use it now, to realize your dreams.

    8 Tips for High Performance Hiring

    Success in hiring the right people determines how quickly a small business moves from survival mode to growth paths. Business success depends on not only hiring good people, but hiring extremely talented people who are the best for the position and the company.

    Below are eight tips for increasing your hiring success-in big or small businesses:

    1. Define Key Objectives of the Position
      Make a prioritized list of five key objectives, then determine the skills and experience needed to be successful in the job.

    2. Create a Thorough Job Description
      Or, at least create an outline of the functions and expectations of this position. Thinking this through helps refine the description and firms up priorities in the hiring decision.

    3. Use a Broad Base of Sources to Find a Sufficient Number of Prospective Candidates
      Asking employees, vendors, colleagues, trade associations, educational and alumni groups, advertising in traditional and non-traditional places helps you cast the broadest net. Give yourself plenty of choices to screen, so that you can narrow down the best choices.

    4. Utilize the Screening Process
      Take advantage of the screening process to gain valuable data on competitive salaries, intelligence and best practices. Call in only those who pass the first few hurdles when evaluated against your key objectives and skills required screen.

    5. Use a Structured Interview Process:
      A. Screen
      B. Inquire
      C. Evaluate & Investigate
      D. Trust but Verify

    6. Ask All Applicants a Core of the Same Questions, then Some Custom Questions Created for their Particular Experience
      During the interviews, ask specific experience and accomplishment-related questions and ask for examples. Try to avoid hypothetical questions as most candidates know the right things to do/say. Asking for specific examples give a better read on what they did and will do in the future.

    7. Check References, Verify Degrees and Steer Clear of People Who Have Too Many Ready Excuses
      Unfortunately in today's litigious employment climate employers must practice "defensive hiring." Be cautious of people who look too good to be true-as they often are.

    8. After the Hire, Create a Thorough Orientation for the New Employee
      Getting the right person off to the best start takes only a little more effort and can reap big rewards. Give progress reports and feedback in the first few days, weeks and months.

    No system is fail proof. However, after thirty years in the staffing industry, as an owner of executive recruiting, employee leasing and employment agencies, I have learned that the extra effort in creating the right climate helps to avoid disasters and hire better people almost every time.

    Sunday, June 13, 2010

    How a Job Seeker Prevent From Mistakes on Job Search

    A job search is not a simple journey. There are plenty of strategies that are needed to be followed to have a successful job search. Most people are not aware of the mistakes that they make in the work of a job search. They often ignore the important strategies of a job search and thus are not rewarded with desired results. They are unsuccessful to get the right job that will act as a boom to their career.

    The most job seekers do not think about their overall career. They basically approach the job search process as the means of getting the next job. They do not for one time think how the job can be beneficial for a successful career. You need to pick it before you take the next step. You need to plan your moves and then take a step ahead. You need to first know the direction that you need to move in and then settle on the steps that you need to take to move in that direction. If your steps are not planned then you won't accomplish your dream.

    You need to research the industry you need to work in, the organizations present in the market related to this industry, the wage that is offered for the post you are seeking the job for. After the research is done you need to settle on the goals that you need to attain, the process you need to make use of to reach out to the potential employers, what will be your approach towards the job hunt, the qualities that separate you from the competitors. These all are needed to pen down and give a serious hard work to evaluate the progress of your job search and also the actions that are needed to correct the hunting measures.
    Here we mentions some basic mistakes made by the job hunters that are needed to keep away from by them. By avoiding these mistakes you can have successful job search. You will land up with the job of your choice that within a small span of time.

    Resumes not Well Prepared

    The most common mistake made by all the job seekers or hunters is that their resumes are not well prepared. The resumes lack focus on accomplishments that have had historically in the past. A resume ought to be up to speed for it is the one that gives the first impression about you to the employer. You need to keep in mind that you are writing a resume and not any other document. Your acceptance for the call of an interview depends on the resume introduced before the employer. You need to stand out of the crowd and this will differentiate you with the competitors of your field.
    Your accomplishments, your qualifications, your experience (if any), your personal details, and the way you can benefit the company through your skills ought to be neatly and effectively mentioned.

    Network Strategies often Neglected

    Network is the most important tool of a job search. You need to understand its importance and bring it in use. You need to keep in contact together with your friends, your colleagues, your acquaintances and plenty of other people whom you know. They can best help you in getting the job. Always keep in mind that not all the jobs are posted on the job portals. There are plenty of companies who hire people through references. So your network can help you reach to such employers without much difficulty.
    The best thing you can do to get the ideal job for yourself is by registering with a lovely recruiting service in the business.

    Saturday, June 12, 2010

    7 trends job seekers and workers should know about :


    Where’s that crystal ball when you need one? While consumer confidence and new home sales are up, job seekers and employers alike are aching to get any good news on the job market these days. A new survey released this week may offer some hope.

    Career Builder and Robert Half International released its annual EDGE Report, which looks at current employment situation and the future hiring landscape. Here are some of the trends the study found and what they mean for you:

    Trend No. 1: In the next 12 months, more than half of employers polled plan to hire full-time employees, 4 in 10 will hire contract, temporary or project workers, and 4 in 10 will hire part-time employees.
    Key takeaway: Don’t get discouraged. While hiring won’t be at the levels they were before the recession, there will be jobs available.

    Trend No. 2: Technology, customer service and sales are the top three areas in which employers expect to add jobs first once the economy rebounds.
    Key takeaway: Look to your transferrable skills and how they relate to these sectors.

    Trend No. 3: The average time to fill open positions, depending on the job level, is 4.5 to 14.4 weeks, the same time range as last year.
    Key takeaway: Have patience. A job search takes time in any economy. Remember to follow up with hiring managers you’ve sent your resume to and with whom you’ve interviewed.

    Trend No. 4: Despite an abundant labor pool, 6 in 10 employers are willing to negotiate with qualified candidates for higher compensation.
    Key takeaway: Skilled workers are in demand. Make sure you are highlighting your specific abilities or get training to learn new expertise.

    Trend No. 5: 4 in 10 employers expect the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to create jobs in their organizations over the next two years.
    Key takeaway: Ask your employer about the areas where your company will be hiring first. If you know anyone who’s looking for a job (and who doesn’t these days) give him or her a head’s up.

    Trend No. 6: More than half of employees polled plan to make a career change or go back to school when the economy recovers.
    Key takeaway: If you are one of those workers in a holding pattern, don’t wait for a full job market revival. Start polishing off that resume and researching training and education options now.

    Trend No. 7: 40 percent of hiring managers said that when the economy improves, giving pay raises will be their primary method for retaining top performers.
    Key takeaway: If you think you merit a raise, start building your case now to show your boss your accomplishments and how you helped contribute to your employer’s bottom line.

    Friday, June 11, 2010

    Top Ten Jobs for the Next Decade and Beyond

    Whether you're about to graduate from high school or are a working adult looking for a career change, choosing a college major can be confusing. It's challenging to select a career path that matches up with your personal passions and still puts food on the table. Understanding some of the trends that shape the job market can help narrow your search. If you're looking for job security and growth, you'll want to focus on the industries that are adding the most new jobs in the coming decade.

    Using data compiled from the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics and from major newspapers and magazines, we've got the information you need on the major careers and trends in the job market today. It should help you choose your career education wisely.

    1. Computer Programmer.

    Even though many American companies actively recruit overseas workers for programming jobs, there is still plenty of work for qualified computer specialists right here in the United States. Security breaches and concerns about potential terrorism have heightened security at many companies. Because "offshoring" computer programming work poses so many security risks, many large employers have reverted to using in-house teams of programmers who can be monitored more carefully. A degree in computer forensics would allow you to become one of the monitors.

    In addition, the development of new operating systems and common code bases has allowed many more industries to develop custom software solutions. A decade ago, many companies from wildly different fields might have used the same spreadsheet program. Today, developers with unique backgrounds build specialized applications like databases, point-of-sale systems, and customer relationship networks.

    2. Day Care Provider.

    Until recently, many day care providers struggled with low wages, high stress, and poor job security. With the explosive demand for quality child care, however, many parents are now willing to pay higher premiums to facilities with excellent reputations and strong learning programs. A professional in this industry can command an even higher salary with an early childhood special education degree.

    Though some parents lament the reduced emphasis on play activities in many modern day care settings, the consumer demand creates many lucrative opportunities for child development majors who want to follow their passion while earning significant rewards.

    3.Elder Care Specialist.

    The parents of Baby Boomers relied on large families to share the burden of caring for elderly loved ones. With fewer children to care for them, the Baby Boomers are turning, in record numbers, to professionally operated assisted living facilities. A far cry from yesterday's nursing homes, today's senior communities often integrate luxury amenities like four-star dining, golf, and live entertainment.

    Despite the luxury resort setting, each facility relies on teams of qualified healthcare specialists to look after the needs of residents. With government and consumer scrutiny of elder care facilities at an all-time high, employers demand job candidates with proven skills and positive attitudes. Consider a degree in health information technology for a fast-growing job with a minimal amount of clinical work.

    4. Employment Specialist.

    Caught between the demands of child care and elder care, more Americans have turned to employment agencies to arrange short term or flexible employment relationships. Likewise, companies that need to scale up or scale down their operations to comply with seasonal customer demand have outsourced their staffing needs to a growing number of professional agencies.

    The U.S. Department of Labor identifies "employment placement specialist" as one of the fastest-growing specialties of the coming decade. For people with strong interpersonal skills and a wide range of interests, this position offers the opportunity to connect eager employers with qualified workers. Not only does this career offer significant job satisfaction, it usually pays a commission on the income of placed workers. Therefore, a busy employment specialist can earn a significant income by using her natural matchmaking talents.

    5. Environmental Engineer.

    With the rapid growth of previously small communities all across the country, many local governments and private developers must wrestle with the challenges of rising populations. At the same time, many of our country's more established cities and towns must cope with crumbling infrastructure, such as outdated water and sewer lines or failing electrical supplies.

    Environmental engineers play an important role in every community. They oversee new construction and renovation, assuring the preservation of natural resources and the safety of residents. With new, more stringent regulations on the books, many environmental engineers now work for developers and corporations that want to take a proactive approach to their business. By acting in the public interest, these companies can build strong relationships with customers while avoiding damaging fines or even prosecution.

    6. Home Health Aide.

    Many aging Baby Boomers intend to live in their own homes for as long as possible. Likewise, many people who suffer from injuries or illness can avoid the huge expenses of a long hospital stay by recuperating at home. Both of these populations rely heavily on the work of home health aides to maintain their well being.

    In many cases, home health aides are nurses who prefer to work in patients' homes instead of in the stressful environment of a hospital or an assisted living facility. Frequently, home health aides benefit from flexible scheduling and short commutes, making this a solid career choice for parents of young children. Some aides can assist licensed professionals without holding a license themselves, offering excellent opportunities to earn income while still completing their degree program.

    7. Management Consultant.

    A growing number of companies prefer to seek outside help with specialized problems or challenges, rather than attempt to keep experts on their own staffs. As a result, consultants who build reputations for solving client problems can earn significant income by dropping in on clients around the world.

    Once dominated by road warriors, the consulting arena has opened up to a variety of professionals, thanks to new networking technology. With qualifications and insight earned from years of experience and study, a consultant might work from home while helping clients all over the world.

    Many professionals who have grown bored with their companies or with their careers can shake things up by setting up shop as a consultant. In fact, many consultants launch their practices while still holding down a day job or completing an advanced degree program

    8. Networking Specialist.

    Unlike a traditional computer programmer, who focuses on solving problems with software, a networking specialist must figure out how to keep all of the various devices in an organization connected to each other. As networking grew from an offshoot of computer engineering into its own specialty, many professionals learned how to efficiently manage a company's information flow through hidden cables and routers.

    Technology continues to advance, so new and different jobs are constantly emerging. Today's networking specialist, for example, must integrate wireless devices like phones, laptops, and pagers into their data structures. Whether working for a private employer, an Internet service provider, or a government agency, networking specialists must work on-site to install and maintain highly specialized equipment. With new generations of networking hardware emerging every few years, this is a professional role that can never be delegated to overseas workers.

    9. Physician's Assistant.

    As more Americans seek medical treatment more frequently, many doctor's offices struggle to keep up with demand. High malpractice insurance rates and the pursuit of less stressful, more lucrative careers are diverting potential doctors into other fields of study. Therefore, many medical practices rely more frequently on physician's assistants to bridge an important gap in the health care process.

    Students who enjoy medicine but do not wish to pursue a full medical degree can launch careers as physician's assistants after only a few years of training. They perform tests, file reports and handle other routine tasks, freeing up doctors to spend more time diagnosing illnesses and researching cures. In some states, physician's assistants can even prescribe medication. An online physician assistant master's program can qualify you for one of these upper-level roles.

    10. Social Services Coordinator.

    With more senior citizens applying for government benefits and many families leaving large cities for smaller towns, many government agencies and non-profit organizations seek qualified social services coordinators. These specialists assure that residents of a community can take full advantage of assistance programs. They also monitor the safety and wellness of individuals, especially young children and older adults that could become the victims of abuse, crime, or fraud. An online social work degree can qualify you for this rewarding career.

    Thursday, June 10, 2010

    Networking: Generating Strong Contacts To Build Your Business

    Owning & operating your own business is one of the best things in the world. One of the things that can make it great is the people you meet & the contacts you make. Networking is a great way to generate a list of helpful contacts & consumers. With the use of the Web, networking & generating nice contacts has never been simpler & in the event you mix the use of the Web with regular networking methods, the contacts you make will be amazingly strong.
    Before the Web things were completed in more of a person-to-person way. Networking might have been completed over the phone, over lunch, or in the coursework of a golf game. It took plenty of work to network & makes contacts. However the contacts were much stronger & gave a face to your business.
    The Web makes networking much faster & simpler. It is as simple as hitting a few keys on the keyboard & clicking the mouse button, & e-mails can be sent back & fourth. There is not very any work in doing this, & this fundamentally frees up more time for you to be able to do other things affiliated along with your business. Although this does appear better, it makes your business a lot less personable.
    Mixing both the Web & person-to-person methods is the best way to have a nice network. Using e-mails, or even discussion forums can be a helpful way to meet people & contacts. I think it is important to know that in order for those contacts to be strong, it would be beneficial to meet person-to-person.
    In doing this, you could generate a great impression & put a face to your business. If the impression is nice the contact could mention your name to one of his friends, & it could flow down to their friends generating an even larger network. In the event you ignore the personable approaches to networking, you contacts might not be as strong. In the event you ignore the use of expertise & the Web, it might be hard to first meet those contacts that can help get your name out.
    Networking is all about communicating with other individuals who can finish up helping you & your business in the long run. Using the Web in conjuncture with person-to-person methods can generate some nice contacts that can help you out for a long time.

    All About Bookkeeping Training Courses

    Bookkeeping is a major part of any business, so that it can run smoothly. This is why, bookkeepers are held in high esteem within companies. Their work includes verifying balance receipts, posting debts & credits & naturally recording all the financial transactions in the company.
    Any businessperson has to know about bookkeeping, even if he employs a bookkeeper for his company. You can also hire the service of a bookkeeping company, but without knowing a tiny bit about bookkeeping, you will be in the fog about the most important aspect of your business - the finances.
    One of the best places to start learning about bookkeeping is the Net. You can take you own time & learn. The courses are flexible & help you to understand the basic about bookkeeping.
    There's four types of courses that are offered online - courses that are given by training companies, universities or colleges, courses offered by an online site training program & courses delivered by application companies. The courses that are delivered by universities & colleges are more rigorous & usually they are of an extended period. You will must meet definite educational criteria before being admitted to these courses.
    The bookkeeping courses that are offered by the application companies will be specific to the application that you buy, & this might narrow down your learning. On the other hand, the net site training systems are private & help you to learn everything related to bookkeeping.
    Make definite that you pick a lovely & reputed online training work because this will be definite that you get quality training. The fee of the net basic bookkeeping courses is reasonable & will also save you the time & the expense to go to a university.
    You can follow the work at your own time. This means that even in case you have a full time job & you require to take up bookkeeping as a part time job, you can do that without any hassle. A quantity of the net bookkeeping training centers will also give you a certification after the completion of the program. This will help you to increase your credential as a bookkeeper, as a considerable number of employers ask for your qualification before hiring.
    What do you require for the net courses?
    Anyone can pursue one of the net bookkeeping courses. All you require is a Laptop & an Net connection. You ought to also have access to Microsoft Word & Excel, as this will be necessary to complete your assignments.
    A quantity of the courses have video classes that you can watch & learn. They also provide plenty of reading materials. However, a quantity of the courses also have interactive classes that you can follow basically with the help of microphone as well as a web cam. You can now attend classes, without the trouble of actually traveling to the place, thus saving on precious time & funds.
    There's a considerable number of bookkeeping courses that are offered to individuals who have an interest in making it a full time career, or even for individuals who require to learn the basics of bookkeeping. You are definite to discover a work that suits your requirement .

    Tuesday, June 8, 2010

    4 Steps for Effective Online Networking


    A popular misconception is that networking is about getting a job or landing a client. In reality, networking is about establishing relationships that provide you with valuable feedback and allow you to make educated decisions.

    Business networking is key to gaining information, increasing your visibility in your field, and establishing personal connections that will help you move forward in your career. The rise of social media hasn’t changed the fact that successful human beings get even further ahead based on the strength of their networks. In fact, social media gives you the power to connect with people who you would never have the opportunity to converse with in the physical world.

    Let’s look at some networking best practices, along with a few ways you can use the various social media sites to engage with previously inaccessible people and get the attention of those who are too busy to return your phone calls or e-mails.

    1. Look for Ways to Expand Your Networks



    In an era where the average person will have more than a dozen jobs in their career, you need to ensure that you’re looking beyond your company and immediate circle so that your networking has lifelong continuity. To that end, seek out and join professional organizations that you have a genuine interest in and attend at least one activity a month. At the same time, habitually ask your contacts if they know anyone who might be a good person for you to meet. At its core, networking should be fun. If you seek out people who care about the same things you do, you’ll enjoy networking and won’t view it as a chore.

    Social media sites — especially the big ones like Facebook (Facebook) and LinkedIn (LinkedIn) — are a networker’s dream. LinkedIn in particular allows you to establish a professional network consisting of your connections and your connections’ connections, automatically linking you to thousands of people in your industry and related ones. It’s a painless means to create new relationships and get introduced to advantageous contacts through people you already know.

    Jason Alba, the author of I’m on LinkedIn — Now What??? recommends joining relevant LinkedIn groups to expand your search visibility, and complementing a LinkedIn group with a Google (Google) or Yahoo! group. He also suggests using the Answers feature to ask a question and invite your network to respond. Questions typically range from knowledge-based issues (e.g. Does anyone know a good web-based survey tool?), to help in finding a job (e.g. Do you know of firms that employ environmental engineers in the San Francisco area?). Asking a question once a month provides an opportunity to probe your contacts in a creative way. Choose the “best answer” to bolster the reputation of the person who provided it, and thank everyone personally who participated. In turn, if someone asks a question that you can answer intelligently, do so, as this increases your visibility in the broader LinkedIn community.

    Whether you’re on LinkedIn or another social network in which you engage with professionals, make it easy for potential contacts to search for you by incorporating keywords into your profile (e.g. database programmer, Linux (Linux) expert). Also, include a link to your professional profiles as part of your e-mail signature line so people can click on them and learn more about you. Within your profiles, include the URLs of articles you’ve written, organizations you belong to, and events where you’re speaking.

    2. Know What You Want, and What You Can Offer




    Many people dislike networking because they think asking a veritable stranger for help is an imposition. As it’s human nature to want to help someone, I think you’ll find that most people will be receptive, provided you approach them the right way.

    Whether you’re meeting people online or offline, you should prepare for networking conversations in advance by considering what you need from the contact. Make sure your planned request is reasonable, considering you barely know the person. Using an example from my own life, asking for 30 minutes of advice on the book publishing industry works a lot better than asking me to refer you to my agent.

    Rachel Solar-Tuttle and Diane Danielson, the authors of Table Talk, say that because networking is a collaboration, every time you ask for something or meet with a potential contact, you should think about how you can help her in return. Follow your contacts’ work carefully so that you can glean insights about how you might assist them. One caveat for this step and the next one: Do not try to impress contacts by promising something you might not be able to deliver, such as a client engagement or an introduction to someone you might not be able to get a hold of.

    High level individuals often use LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter (Twitter), and their blogs to publicly express what they’re working on, and the business problems that are vexing them. Pay attention to the questions they’re asking and provide helpful resources and information in the form of comments or LinkedIn Answers. If they’re in the midst of launching a new product or initiative, help them spread the word. Giving freely of your own knowledge and support is the best way to launch a one-on-one relationship that will eventually pay major dividends.

    3. Contact the Person Privately

    Once you’ve gotten to know the person a bit, it’s time to get more personal. Send a warm-up message to re-introduce yourself and cite recent activities of theirs that you may have followed. Try for a more intimate angle (for example, you can comment that you have a child who’s the same age, or that you also enjoy skiing and recently tried a terrific new resort in Colorado). I, for example, got the following DM on Twitter recently.



    Legalbear must know that I’m a wanna-be environmentalist who adores the Caribbean.

    When approaching a potential contact, be friendly, respectful and brief, and be very clear about your request. Always keep in mind that the person is doing you a favor. If you’re connecting online and he says he’s in the middle of something, ask if you can talk at another time, and be conscious of his time commitments. If your request involves a conversation and you’re located in the same geographic location, it can’t hurt to try for an in-person meeting. When you sit down with your contact, offer to pay any expenses associated with the meeting, and remember to send him a thank you note afterward.

    Even if you feel like the relationship is going somewhere, you should still manage your expectations. It’s unlikely that any a brand new contact will offer anything concrete like a job offer. Remember that your goal should be to gain valuable insights or information in the short-term and a meaningful professional relationship in the long-term.

    4. Follow Up Regularly

    It’s your responsibility to keep the lines of communication open. Did your contact give you any advice or suggest a course of action? If so, touch base every so often to remind her who you are and keep her apprised of your progress. Keep on top of her career moves and make sure she stays informed of yours. Invite her to get together again, and during the holiday season, send her a card with a nice note.

    I get hundreds of e-mails every day, but this one from Laura Strauss stood out as an effective follow-up, because it was kind, non-intrusive, specific, and action-oriented:



    Conclusion


    I hope these ideas make networking go down a little easier for you. One word of caution, though. Having these tactics in your back pocket does not give you permission to stalk important people. In fact, the more personal the level of interaction, the greater potential for abuse, so you must proceed with caution. Apply the 3/6 rule of networking, in which you contact someone no more than three times in a six week period. If the person or organization does not engage back within that time frame, then move on. There are plenty of valuable contacts who will be open to your overtures.


    This Article are written by Alexandra Levit is the author of “New Job, New You: A Guide to Reinventing Yourself in a Bright New Career.” Learn more at www.newjobnewyou.com.

    I Like this Article and Post for information to other Networkers with thanks from Mashable.com

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